General,  NEWS,  Politics

Conspiracy Theories

Definition of conspiracy

noun, plural con·spir·a·cies.

the act of conspiring.
an evil, unlawful, treacherous, or surreptitious plan formulated in secret by two or more persons; plot.
a combination of persons for a secret, unlawful, or evil purpose: He joined the conspiracy to overthrow the government.
Law: an agreement by two or more persons to commit a crime, fraud, or other wrongful act.
Synonyms for conspiracy

PLOT, INTRIGUE, MACHINATION, CONSPIRACY, CABAL
mean a plan secretly devised to accomplish an evil or treacherous end.

  • PLOT implies careful foresight in planning a complex scheme: e.g. an assassination plot.
  • INTRIGUE suggests secret underhanded maneuvering in an atmosphere of duplicity.
  • MACHINATION implies a contriving of annoyances, injuries, or evils by indirect means.
  • CONSPIRACY implies a secret agreement among several people usually involving treason or great treachery.
  • CABAL typically applies to political intrigue involving persons of some eminence.

More synonyms for conspiracy: cabalcrewgangMafiamobringsyndicate

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conspiracy

Conspiracy Theory

noun

  • a theory that rejects the standard ( official ) explanation for an event and instead credits a covert group or organization with carrying out a secret plote.g. One popular conspiracy theory accuses environmentalists of sabotage in last year’s mine collapse.
  • a belief that a particular unexplained event was caused by such a covert group: e.g. A number of conspiracy theories have already emerged, purporting to explain last week’s disappearance of a commercial flight over international waters.
  • the idea that many important political events or economic and social trends are the products of deceptive plots that are largely unknown to the general public: e.g. The more I learn about the activities of intelligence agencies, the less far-fetched I find many geopolitical conspiracy theories.

There are “conspiracy theory” explanations that can no longer be dismissed as the paranoid delusions of far-right crackpots. Indeed, they have become a necessary response to a risky and increasingly globalized world, in which everything is connected but nothing adds up.

Anyone who engages critically with the phenomenon of conspiracy theories soon encounters a conundrum.
Actual conspiracies occur quite regularly. Political assassinations, scandals and cover-ups, terrorist attacks and a lot of everyday government activity involves the collusion of multiple people in the attempt to bring about a desired outcome.

Sometimes a “conspiracy theory” turns out to be a real conspiracy…

This poses a crucial question. How do we differentiate between genuine plots and conspiracies, and those that we usually associate with the term “conspiracy theory” – namely an erroneous or misguided way of thinking? How do we know, for example, when questions about the origins of coronavirus are legitimate concerns and when they should be dismissed as a conspiracy theory

Conspiracy theories have a long history, but the actual term “conspiracy theory” emerged much more recently. It was only a few decades ago that the term took on the derogatory connotations it has today, where to call someone a conspiracy theorist functions as an insult.

So it may come as no surprise that there is even a conspiracy theory about the origins of the label. This conspiracy theory claims that the CIA invented the term in 1967 to disqualify those who questioned the official version of John F Kennedy’s assassination and doubted that his killer, Lee Harvey Oswald, had acted alone.

There are even two versions of this conspiracy theory. The more extreme version claims that the CIA literally invented the term in the sense that the words “conspiracy” and “theory” had never been used before in combination. A more moderate version acknowledges that the term existed before, but claims that the CIA intentionally created its negative connotations and so turned the label into a tool of political propaganda.


Worth a thought…

“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” — Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi propaganda minister

People who believe that there is no major world conspiracy which involves a small number of people manipulating humanity through a hierarchical structure of control toward a New World Order, all have one identical factor in common. They have, in actual fact, not looked genuinely into the abundance of well-researched information on world conspiracy to see if there is one!   –   David Icke


List of most popular conspiracy theories

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In principle, conspiracy theories are not false by default and their validity depends on evidence just as in any theory.
Many conspiracy theories relate to clandestine government plans and elaborate murder plots.

The List


Alex Jones referenced numerous conspiracy theories for convincing his supporters to endorse Ron Paul over Mitt Romney and Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton.


Popular Conspiracy Theories Examples

Moonlanding Hoax Confession

It is amazing how this confession is consistent with 1978 movie Capricorn One

Capricorn One is a 1978 British-produced American thriller film in which a reporter discovers that a supposed Mars landing by a crewed mission to the planet has been faked via a conspiracy involving the government and—under duress—the crew themselves. It was written and directed by Peter Hyams and produced by Lew Grade’s ITC Entertainment. It stars Elliott Gould as the reporter, and James Brolin, Sam Waterston, and O. J. Simpson as the astronauts. Hal Holbrook plays a senior NASA official who goes along with governmental and corporate interests and helps to fake the mission.

Apollo 11: How much did it cost to land astronauts on the moon?

In 1961, when President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to sending an astronaut to the moon “before this decade is out,” the federal budget enjoyed a surplus and economists were calling for government spending to stimulate the economy. Even so, the final price tag still boggles the mind. Between 1960 and 1973, NASA spent $28 billion developing the rockets, spacecraft and ground systems needed for what became the Apollo program. According to a recent analysis by the Planetary Society, that translates into an estimated $288.1 billion in inflation-adjusted dollars.


Depopulation agenda is not a conspiracy theory

 


Covid-19 Plandemic Conspiracy

One of the most popular topics in 2020 is plan of Bill Gates to vaccinate the entire population of the world


Is it a conspiracy?

https://www.facebook.com/ODDTV/videos/621689108693621


Covid-19 Pandemic Inquiry

https://fb.watch/2YchfQtE0x/

Weaponizing Vaccines

https://fb.watch/2Hqxtzh3TO/


Subject Related (each link offers important information):


Nine One One Event

For a huge amount of research and evidence regarding 911 event, visit https://www.ae911truth.org/

nine one one

 


 

 

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